Sketching life along the rails, Part 2

As promised last week, here is another set of train-themed sketches. We’re again featuring more of the late 1940’s, early 1950’s New York Central sketches by artists Joseph Hirsch and Carol Johnson, as well as some current images by James Napoleon.

First are the older sketches. As we saw last week, the artists have captured a day in the life of a railroader. Although a few engineers and conductors can be seen, they mostly feature the hardest workers: those that lay the ties, that place the rails, and those that secure the two together. This is one of the most integral jobs with the railroad – for without tracks there would be no places for the trains to go.

 
  
 
  
 
  
 
  

Our more current sketches are by artist and Harlem Line rider James Napoleon. I first met James quite a few months ago, when I caught him sketching me on the train. He tries to do at least one sketch per day, and has several sketchbooks filled with various people seen on the train, at the park, or in other places. I find it amusing that a lot of the train people found in his sketchbook are sleeping, because it is an apt depiction of the people on his morning train (see the post: Those Wassaic People). For more of Mr. Napoleon’s work you can check out his website, which shows many of his lovely paintings.