Vigil in Solidarity with the Gaza Freedom March @ White Plains

This evening several folks braved the cold and stood outside White Plains Train Station in support of the Gaza Freedom March. Some held banners and signs, while others passed out leaflets. The event was set up by WESPAC. Their site briefly explains the purpose of the event:

One year after Operation Cast Lead, under the horrific Blockade/Siege imposed by Israel, Palestinians in Gaza continue to be killed — farmers working in their fields near the borders, fishermen trying to pull some food out of the sea, and people in the smuggling tunnels struggling to bring cooking gas, food, and other of life’s necessities into Gaza. And now we hear that babies are being born half dead from their mothers’ exposure to the only water available, contaminated water.

On Dec. 31, over 1300 people from 42 countries around the world will join an expected 50,000 Palestinians in Gaza in a nonviolent march to the Israeli border to END THE SIEGE OF GAZA. A number of our friends from the Westchester and Rockland Peace and Justice Community and beyond will be part of this historic march… COME DEMONSTRATE YOUR SOLIDARITY WITH THE GAZA FREEDOM MARCH!

When I took a picture of this guy, he asked me if I had an opinion on the situation in Gaza. I partially lied saying that I’m not really sure, and said it is a politically tense subject that I tend to steer clear from. I think if I really had “no opinion” at all on the matter, it wouldn’t be nearly as hard to write this post. And I am certainly having difficulty, partially due to me attempting to write neutrally here.

My opinion aside, I think it is a good thing when people come together for a cause, and bring it to our attention. Especially at a place like a train station. We just run back and forth so consumed in our own lives. We worry about the train being late, MTA’s cuts in service, and what we plan on having for dinner… while there are others in the world that wonder if they will have dinner at all. And that is if they were lucky enough not to get killed that day. And perhaps it gave train riders something to think about on the ride home.