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Remembering Lou Grogan, “The Coming of the New York & Harlem Railroad” Author

It is with great sadness that I must report that Louis V. Grogan has passed on. Laid to rest yesterday morning (along with a copy of his beloved book) in his long-time home of Pawling, New York, Grogan was 88 years old. Lou’s interest in railroads began at an early age, as many of his family members found employ in that industry. His love affair with the Harlem comes partially due to his longtime residence along its tracks, but also due to fond childhood memories of using the smooth wood floors of the long-gone Philmont station as an impromptu skating rink. Although he himself served a brief stint as a railroad worker, he also served in the Army during World War II on the eastern front, and was a longtime employee of IBM in Poughkeepsie.

Before selfies were cool
Before selfies were cool – Lou Grogan snaps a reflection at the then-new White Plains station.
Title photo of Pawling also by Lou Grogan.

Lou is, however, most Known by railfans as the author of The Coming of the New York & Harlem Railroad, an immense and unprecedented compilation of Harlem Railroad history, published in 1989. The book was a labor of love in more ways than one. A ten year endeavor of research and writing, the book may never have come to fruition without the support of Lou’s wife Elizabeth, who lovingly laid out many of the book’s pages, and remained supportive through many long hours of work. To this day, the book remains the best compilation of history regarding the Harlem Railroad, detailing every station that is and was along the line, and the ultimate demise of the Upper Harlem. This website, and the research found within, owes much to the groundwork compiled by Lou.

I, however, will remember Lou as a kind man who invited me into his home with his wife, and shared his vast collection of Harlem Line material with me. I will fondly remember eating turkey and cheese sandwiches and drinking ginger ale with him while talking about the Harlem Line. Many historical photos on this website come from Lou’s collection, which he and his wife graciously shared with me.

1936 Signal Dept Gang- Sid Phillips, Tom Wright, Lou Frost, and "Mac" McLeod
Signal Department Gang at Pawling station, 1936. L-R: Sid Phillips, Tom Wright, Lou Frost, and “Mac” McLeod. From the collection of Lou Grogan.

Steaming through Pawling, 1947.
Steaming through Pawling, 1947. From the collection of Lou Grogan.

As I have mentioned a few times, very shortly we will be revisiting all of the current Harlem Line stations – a redo of our Tuesday Tour series. I have already re-photographed all of the stations along the line, with the exception of five. Our new tour of the Harlem Line will be dedicated to Lou, who worked so hard to ensure that the long history of the Harlem – New York City’s oldest railroad – was always remembered. Thanks for everything, and as another friend of yours has already said online, “may you enjoy the great train ride in Heaven.”

7 thoughts on “Remembering Lou Grogan, “The Coming of the New York & Harlem Railroad” Author

  1. Very sorry to hear of Lou Grogan’s death. Sadly, I never had the good fortune of meeting him. Though I did purchase “The Coming…” shortly after it was published, and have enjoyed since, both as a reminiscence of 20 years riding the Harlem, and as an excellent reference. Thank you for your tribute to this fine gentleman.

  2. Hi Emily – this is a lovely tribute – Mr. Grogan’s book has been invaluable to me throughout my career, and his passing is certainly a loss.

  3. Hi Emily, I’m sorry to learn of Lou’s passing. I’m an engineer on the Harlem line. What a great history book of the Harlem line. An retired engineer gave me this book, with a good luck message. So this book has alot of sentimental value to me. Ironically, I know Lou’s sons, and knew of him, from Pawling as I am from here as well. Thanks for sharing.

  4. Obtained a copy of his book when it was published and corresponded with him in long hand letters. Pre e- mail. Still have them So much more personal. Wonder if anyone will do another book on this historic railroad. So few original sources left like Lou.
    Tom

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